Sorrow and Loss


The Starry Night

Vincent van Gogh

“When he shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars,
And he will make the face of heaven so fine
That all the world will be in love with night
And pay no worship to the garish sun.

William Shakespeare

My dear friends, it is with a very great sorrow that I tell you that my dear son Andrew died yesterday.

SENIOR SALON 2017

It is with regret that I must tell you my dear Senior Salon participants that I am going on what may be a long hiatus from writing this blog and this will be the last Senior Salon for some time.  It has been my very great pleasure to meet all of you and to run the Salon.  I wish all of you continued success in your artistic endeavors.

creaturity3

art-ad-creativity

We have walked our paths a long time and have a lot to offer. Come and reveal your artistic vision.

The SENIOR SALON is dedicated to showcasing the talents of the post 9 to 5 generation. The generation who finally has time to get in touch with the right side of their brain.  The SENIOR SALON features art, music, writing, poetry, photography, creative cooking, creative fashion, and anything else that you can dream up.   Allow YOUR muse to guide you into a new creative endeavor or enhance an existing creative endeavor.

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52 WEEKS OF THANKFULNESS – WEEK 49

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BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN THE WORLD.

I invite you to come and join me on this pilgrimage to change the world through thankfulness.  Perhaps if enough of us join together we can change the negative climate that exists and is overtaking our planet. Together we can move our fellow citizens of to a better, higher and finer place.

My life for the past month has been filled with a deep grief which mounts in size everyday.  I have reached a point where writing has become a task instead of a pleasure.  So for now, I am taking a hiatus from my blog.  I feel very sad that I am stopping this challenge three weeks short of accomplishment.  But I am thankful for the wonderful people who have joined me on this journey and for you thoughtful readers and your comments. 

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52 Weeks of Thankfulness – Week 12

The Shower of Blessings

This is the 52 Weeks of Thankfulness – Week 12 at Haddon Musings

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May 28, 2017 (in two days) will be the 6th wedding anniversary of Mercy and Will. Mercy is in her 23rd week of pregnancy. They are taking a vacation in Ottawa and Toronto Canada for their anniversary and having a blast. I’m so thankful that they could spend their fun time together before the busy and exciting parenthood.

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Please join and share your thankfulness at 52 Weeks of Thankfulness

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Blogging, Book Trailers and Balance

Brigid is taking a much needed rest and will be missed.

Watching the Daisies

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Blogging is not for the fainthearted; it takes real commitment and many hours spent at a computer to create blog posts, comment on other blogs, reply to comments, create bonds with new followers…

It is also rather addictive!

Finding a balance between real life and blogging takes quite a bit of fine tuning…

My own self care continues to be a priority, as I manage my fibromyalgia symptoms with:

  • Nutritious food,
  • Meditation and creative visualisation
  • Gratitude
  • Walking
  • Gardening
  • Sitting in my garden…

” As I spend time in Mother Nature I restore harmony and balance.”

My spirit is calling me to rest more after my recent bout of shingles .

I shall be posting less often over the summer months, but I shall continue to follow and comment on your blogs. I will also re-blog a few favourites…

I have been participating in Bernadette of Haddon Musings  52 Weeks of Thankfulness writing prompt for almost a year. It is…

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FEMINIST FRIDAY

Monday, May 27th Memorial Day is celebrated in the United States.  It is a day set aside to honor those who serve and protect our democracy.  Here is my contribution in honor of the very many brave women who have served or who are currently serving in the United States Army.

American Revolutionary War

(1775-1783)

The origins of service

During the Revolutionary War, women served the U.S. Army in traditional roles as nurses, seamstresses and cooks for troops in camp. Some courageous women served in combat either alongside their husbands or disguised as men, while others operated as spies for the cause. Though not in uniform, women shared Soldiers’ hardships including inadequate housing and little compensation.

The Civil War

(1861-1865)

More than 400 women disguised themselves as men and fought in the Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War.

A willingness to assume new roles

During the Civil War, women stepped into many nontraditional roles. Many women supported the war effort as nurses and aides, while others took a more upfront approach and secretly enlisted in the Army or served as spies and smugglers. Women were forced to adapt to the vast social changes affecting the nation, and their ability and willingness to assume these new roles helped shape the United States.

(1898-1901)

The creation of the Army Nurse Corps

With the Spanish-American War came an epidemic of typhoid fever and a need for highly qualified Army nurses. The surgeon general requested and promptly received congressional authority to appoint women nurses under contract, April 28, 1898. Due to the exemplary performance of these Army contract nurses, the U.S. military realized that it would be helpful to have a corps of trained nurses, familiar with military ways, on call. This led the Army to establish a permanent Nurse Corps in 1901.

World War I

(1917-1918)

More than 35,000 American women served in the military during World War I.

Their service helped propel the passage of the 19th Amendment

Upwards of 25,000 American women between the ages of 21 and 69 served overseas during World War I. They began going in August of 1914—at first singly or with a few companions, later with service organizations, and lastly at the request of the U.S. government. Although the largest number were nurses, women served in numerous other capacities – from administrators and secretaries to telephone operators and architects. Many women continued to serve long after Armistice Day, some returning home as late as 1923. Their efforts and contributions in the Great War left a lasting legacy that inspired change across the nation. The service of these women helped propel the passage of the 19th Amendment, June 4, 1919, guaranteeing women the right to vote.

Army nurses were sent to Europe to support the American Expeditionary Forces. Training with gas masks was mandatory for all women serving in France in WWI. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Army Women's Museum)

Army Nurse Corps

Army Nurse Corps

More than half of the women who served in the U.S. armed forces in World War I – roughly 21,000 – belonged to the Army Nurse Corps.

U.S. Army Signal Corps

U.S. Army Signal Corps

The U.S. Army Signal Corps recruited and trained more than 220 women – best known as the “Hello Girls” – to serve overseas as bilingual telephone operators.

Civilian Welfare Organizations

Civilian Welfare Organization

Women served in large numbers in civilian welfare organizations both at home and abroad, including the American Red Cross, YMCA, and Salvation Army.

Historical Highlights

World War II

(1939-1945)

‘To free a man to fight’

Although the idea of women in the Army other than the Army Nurse Corps was not completely abandoned following World War I, it was not until the threat of world war loomed again that renewed interest was given to this issue. With the rumblings of World War II on the horizon, Congresswoman Edith Nourse Rogers of Massachusetts states, “I was resolved that our women would not again serve with the Army without the same protection the men got.” Consequently, the creation of the Women’s Army Corps is one of the most dramatic gender-changing events in American history.

Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs) were the first brave women to fly American military aircraft. They forever changed the role of women in aviation.

Women step up to perform an array of critical Army jobs, “to free a man to fight.” They work in hundreds of fields such as military intelligence, cryptography, parachute rigging, maintenance and supply, to name a few. Additionally, more than 60,000 Army Nurses serve around the world and over 1,000 women flew aircraft for the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots. Through the course of the war, 140,000 women served in the U.S. Army and the Women’s Army Corps proved itself vital to the effort. The selfless sacrifice of these brave women usher in new economic and social changes that will forever alter the role of women in American society.

A Permanent Presence

(1945-1954)

Gender and racial integration

The period immediately following World War II was one of uncertainty and constant change for the Women’s Army Corps personnel. The original intent of the WAC was to last for the duration of the war plus 6-months. However, this post-war period also marked great strides for integrating both the WAC and the Army Nurse Corps into the Regular Army.

Historical Highlights

Professional and Poised

(1955-1970)

The Women’s Army marches on

After the Korean War, and with the move of the WAC Training Center and School to Fort McClellan, Ala., the focus of the Corps shifted to the examination of management practices and the image of the WAC. The WAC directors in the 1950s and 1960s sought to expand WAC by increasing the types of jobs available in the Army, and by promoting the Corps to not only possible recruits, but also to their family members. The leadership worked hard to act as role models and to instruct the women to respect the Corps, take pride in their work, and ensure that their personal behavior and appearance was always above reproach. Their success was marked by a request from the Army chief of staff to lift the recruitment ceiling on the number of women. It was also during this era we see the removal of restrictions on promotions, assignments and utilization.

A Time of Change

(1970-1978)

Moving toward equality and the disestablishment of the WAC

The Vietnam War, the elimination of the draft, and the rise of the feminist movement had a major impact on both the Women’s Army Corps and Army Nurse Corps. There was a renewed emphasis on parity and increased opportunity for women in uniform.

A New Era

(1980s-1990s)

Providing greater opportunities for women

The disestablishment of the WAC and the integration of women into the Regular Army paved the way for women to continue breaking down gender barriers. In the ensuing years, the Army was called upon to respond to regional conflicts, natural disasters and humanitarian crises around the globe. The roles of Army Women are tested and re-defined during these contingency operations.

Post 9/11

(2001-Present)

Looking to the future

The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 mark a pivotal changing point for Army women. As the Army’s mission changed on the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan, so did the roles of women in its ranks. With the Global War on Terror campaign, there was a rapid expansion of jobs and change in roles for Army women. Beginning In 2016, women have the equal right to choose any military occupational specialty including ground combat units that were previously unauthorized.

THOUGHTS ON THURSDAY

 

The defense of our nation is a shared responsibility. Women have served in the defense of this land for years before our United States was born. They have contributed their talents, skills and courage to this endeavor for more than two centuries with an astounding record of achievement that stretches from Lexington and Concord to the Persian Gulf and beyond.

Retired Gen. Gordon R. Sullivan

Chief of Staff of the Army, 1991-1995

SENIOR SALON 2017

 

 

 

creaturity3

art-ad-creativity

We have walked our paths a long time and have a lot to offer. Come and reveal your artistic vision.

The SENIOR SALON is dedicated to showcasing the talents of the post 9 to 5 generation. The generation who finally has time to get in touch with the right side of their brain.  The SENIOR SALON features art, music, writing, poetry, photography, creative cooking, creative fashion, and anything else that you can dream up.   Allow YOUR muse to guide you into a new creative endeavor or enhance an existing creative endeavor.

Continue reading

Cousin Dotsie’s Reunion and Other Nice Stories

A post filled with thankfulness for the small but important moments in life.

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Saturday

Cousin Dotsie ‘s family reunion took place yesterday at a little house in Windsor,  a small town about twenty minutes north of the rabbit patch.  Reunions seem to be the sole purpose of the old house, as Cousin Dotsie has another residence in Windsor, as well.  All of  her last minute details unfolded as if she had labored over them a fortnight.  It was a lovely occasion, to say the least.

Somehow, there was barbecue, chicken, many sides and a sideboard full of desserts. I arrived a bit after twelve, straight from the woods.  I had been cutting elder flowers, mint and other such  things, to take to Elizabeth City.  I used coolers to transport them and had wanted to wait to the last minute, to cut them.

Cousin Alice was there from New York.  I met her a little over a year ago but,  it was as if…

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Thankfulness Mondays – “In Their Thoughts!”

Dianne writes with thankfulness about the many caring people in her life.

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Week 48 (of 52)…… I’ve been posting along with Bernadette of Haddon Musings and others, of the many things in our lives we have to be thankful for, sometimes they are small and may go unnoticed, and other times they can be very obvious. We hope that by doing so, it may offset for us and others, the negative areas in our lives.

Today I’m thankful for those in my life, who I know are available when I need advice, prayer or when I just need to realize that I am in their thoughts.

It is important not only for me but I believe many, when there is an area of concern in our lives; that someone makes us aware that they care and are willing to listen. Sometimes that’s all that is necessary. Actually since I first mentioned that my husband and I were moving, and the various issues and concerns I had…

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