Thursday photo prompt – Green#writephoto

 

THE CHOICE

I grew up in the Valley of the Amazons surrounded by strong, beautiful and wise women.  I learned to be fleet of foot, strong of arm and to make wise choices.  I loved the women who raised me and my childhood was happy but there was always a dark cloud that loomed in the background.  The women told me the day would come when I would need to leave the security of the Valley and follow the River of Life to the Tunnels of Choice.  I would need to choose to take either the Tunnel of Self Reliance & Loneliness or the Tunnel of Love & Dependence.

So here I stand this day at the mouth of the tunnels ready to make this choice.  Good thing I brought this pick along with me.  Because all the days of my life I will chip away at the wall that separates my choices.

This is written in response to Sue Vincent’s prompt and for all the daughters of Amazons who continue to chip away at the wall.

Thursday photo prompt – Green#writephoto, https://s.vincent.com/2017/05/11.

 

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52 WEEKS OF THANKFULNESS – WEEK 31

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BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN THE WORLD.

I invite you to come and join me on this pilgrimage to change the world through thankfulness.  Perhaps if enough of us join together we can change the negative climate that exists and is overtaking our planet. Together we can move our fellow citizens of to a better, higher and finer place.

This past week found me thinking about many, many issues dealing with women’s rights.  A lot of this musing, of course, was provoked by the Women’s March on Washington.  I was out to dinner a few nights before the March and the whole validity of the March was challenged because of one unsubstantiated allegation of non inclusiveness.  As I started to defend the importance of the March, my husband eloquently sprung to its defense and the need for women’s rights to be brought to forefront of our nation’s leaders.  I am so thankful for the support of my husband, Dom.

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52 WEEKS OF THANKFULNESS – WEEK 30

52weekw

BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN THE WORLD.

I invite you to come and join me on this pilgrimage to change the world through thankfulness.  Perhaps if enough of us join together we can change the negative climate that exists and is overtaking our planet. Together we can move our fellow citizens of to a better, higher and finer place.

This week finds me thinking about the momentous changes that are going to happen in our country starting Friday.  I am thankful that I live in a country that celebrates a man whose life brought out the finer aspects of our country and brought about so much positive change, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  And, I am thankful that I live in a country where his spirit of non-violenent action continues to be kept alive in the Woman’s March on Washington.  This event is intended to be a non-violent protest in the form of marches all over our country.  Women will gather on Saturday, January 21st to “show solidarity and to demand our safety in a time when our country is marginalizing us and making sexual assault an electable and forgivable norm. “

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FEMINIST FRIDAY

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May is Honor Older American Month.  I am dedicating this column to honoring the many wonderful women who are using this bonus time in their lives to blaze trails filled with creativity.  Today I am going to feature Faith Ringgold who at the age of 84 is still creating unique works of art.  She quilts the Fabric of History.

What follows is from the New York Times Style Magazine.  The story features many women artists who have become famous during these bonus years.  If you have an opportunity please try to read it,  it can be found in the May 15 issue of the New York Times Style Magazine, NYTimes.com.

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FAITH RINGGOLD
Faith Ringgold, 84, learned how to sew as a child from her mother, Willi Posey, a fashion designer. Her early pieces included hooded masks with fabric, beads and raffia; she also made dolls and life-size soft sculpture. Her signature work is her evocative series of “story quilts,” which include both imagery and handwritten text; she made her first of these, “Who’s Afraid of Aunt Jemima,” in 1983.

Ringgold is a longtime champion of both women’s rights — she crusaded to get Betye Saar and Barbara Chase-Riboud, among the few black women the museum had ever shown, into the Whitney Annual in 1970 — and of her own proud heritage. In the mid- to late ’60s, she made paintings and posters supporting the Civil Rights movement. A show of that seminal work, “American People, Black Light,” was exhibited at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in November 2013. The artist first published her memoir, “We Flew Over the Bridge,” in 1995. She also writes and illustrates children’s books, which share the colorful, celebratory imagery of her paintings. The winner of the Caldecott Medal in 1992 for “Tar Beach,” Ringgold just published her 16th children’s book, “Harlem Renaissance Party,” which introduces some of that great cultural movement’s key members to young readers.

“If you live long enough and you persist, you are going to get recognition,” Ringgold says today. “You have to stay in the game.” Ringgold has not only stayed in the game, she recently designed one of her own, called “Quiltuduko,” for mobile devices. Inspired by Sudoku, the number game, it uses quilt designs instead of numbers.

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FAITH RINGGOLD YOU ROCK!

 

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FEMINIST FRIDAY – RACHEL MADDOW

we can do it

CONTINUING APRIL’S THEME OF CELEBRATING DIVERSITY, THIS WEEK’S SUBJECT IS RACHEL MADDOW WHO WAS THE FIRST OPENLY GAY HOST OF A PRIME TIME NEWS PROGRAM.  RACHEL MADDOW IS AN AMAZINGLY ACCOMPLISHED WOMAN AND HERE IS HER BIOGRAPHY FROM WIKIPEDIA.

Rachel Maddow was born in Castro Valley, California. Her father, Robert B. “Bob” Maddow, is a former United States Air Force captain who resigned his commission the year before her birth and then worked as a lawyer for the East Bay Municipal Utility District. Her mother, Elaine Maddow (née Gosse), was a school program administrator. She has one older brother, David. Her paternal grandfather was from an Eastern European Jewish family (the original family surname being “Medwedof”), while her paternal grandmother was of Dutch (Protestant) background; her mother, originally from Newfoundland, Canada, is of English and Irish ancestry. Maddow has stated that her family is “very, very Catholic,” and she grew up in a community that her mother has described as “very conservative.” Maddow was a competitive athlete and participated in three sports in high school: volleyball, basketball, and swimming. Referencing John Hughes films, she has described herself as being “a cross between the jock and the antisocial girl” in high school.

A graduate of Castro Valley High School, she attended Stanford University. While a freshman, she was outed by the college newspaper when an interview with her was published before she could tell her parents.  Maddow earned a degree in public policy at Stanford in 1994. At graduation, she was awarded the John Gardner Fellowship. She was also the recipient of a Rhodes Scholarship and began her postgraduate study in 1995 at Lincoln College, Oxford. This made her the first openly gay or lesbian American to win an international Rhodes Scholarship. In 2001, she earned a Doctor of Philosophy (DPhil) in politics at Oxford University.  Her thesis is titled HIV/AIDS and Health Care Reform in British and American Prisons, and her supervisor was Lucia Zedner.

Radio Career
Maddow’s first radio hosting job was in 1999WRNX (100.9 FM) in Holyoke, Massachusetts, then home to “The Dave in the Morning Show”. She entered and won a contest the station held to find a new sidekick for the show’s host, Dave Brinnel.[25] She went on to host Big Breakfast on WRSI in Northampton, Massachusetts, for two years. She left the show in 2004 to join the new Air America.[24] There she hosted Unfiltered along with Chuck D (of the hip hop group Public Enemy) and Lizz Winstead (co-creator of The Daily Show) until its cancellation in March 2005.[26] Two weeks after the cancellation of Unfiltered in April 2005, Maddow’s weekday two-hour radio program, The Rachel Maddow Show, began airing; in March 2008 it gained an hour, broadcasting from 6 to 9 p.m. EST, with David Bender filling in the third hour for the call-in section, when Maddow was on TV assignment. In 2008, the show’s length returned to two hours when Maddow began a nightly MSNBC television program. In 2009, after renewing her contract with Air America, Maddow returned to the 5 a.m. hour-long slot.  Her last Air America show was on January 21, 2010, two weeks before its owners filed for bankruptcy.

Television Career
In June 2005, Maddow became a regular panelist on the MSNBC show Tucker.  During and after the November 2006 election, she was a guest on CNN’s Paula Zahn Now; she was also a correspondent for The Advocate Newsmagazine, an LGBT-oriented short-form newsmagazine for Logo deriving from news items published by The Advocate. In January 2008, Maddow became an MSNBC political analyst and was a regular panelist on MSNBC’s Race for the White House with David Gregory and MSNBC’s election coverage as well as a frequent contributor on Countdown with Keith Olbermann.

In 2008, Maddow was the substitute host for Countdown with Keith Olbermann, her first time hosting a program on MSNBC. Maddow described herself on air as “nervous.” Keith Olbermann complimented her work, and she was brought back to host Countdown the next month. The show she hosted was the highest-rated news program among people aged 25 to 54.[31] For her success, Olbermann ranked Maddow third in his show’s segment “World’s Best Persons.” In July 2008 Maddow filled in again for several broadcasts.  Maddow also filled in for David Gregory as host of Race for the White House.

Olbermann began to push for Maddow to get her own show at MSNBC, and he was eventually able to persuade Phil Griffin to give her Dan Abrams’s time slot.

The Rachel Maddow Show
Main article: The Rachel Maddow Show (TV series)
In August 2008, MSNBC announced The Rachel Maddow Show would replace Verdict with Dan Abrams in the network’s 9 p.m. slot the following month.  Following its debut, the show topped Countdown as the highest-rated show on MSNBC on several occasions.  After being on air for more than a month, Maddow’s program doubled the audience that hour. This show made Maddow the first openly gay or lesbian host of a prime-time news program in the United States.

Early reviews for the show were positive. Los Angeles Times writer Matea Gold said that Maddow “finds the right formula on MSNBC,”  and The Guardian declared that Maddow had become the “star of America’s cable news.” Associated Press columnist David Bauder opined that she was “[Keith] Olbermann’s political soul mate,” and he described the Olbermann-Maddow shows as a “liberal two-hour block.”

Public Image and Publicity
Maddow has been profiled in People, The Guardian, and The New York Observer and has appeared on The View and Charlie Rose.

A 2011 Hollywood Reporter profile of Maddow said that she was able to deliver news “with agenda, but not hysteria.” A Newsweek profile said, “At her best, Maddow debates ideological opponents with civility and persistence… But for all her eloquence, she can get so wound up ripping Republicans that she sounds like another smug cable partisan.” The Baltimore Sun critic David Zurawik accused Maddow of acting like “a lockstep party member.” The editors of The New Republic similarly criticized her – naming her among the “most over-rated thinkers” of 2011, they called her program “a textbook example of the intellectual limitations of a perfectly settled perspective.” On awarding the Interfaith Alliance’s Faith and Freedom Award named for Walter Cronkite, Rev. Dr. C Welton Gaddy remarked that “Rachel’s passionate coverage of the intersection of religion and politics exhibits a strong personal intellect coupled with constitutional sensitivity to the proper boundaries between religion and government.”

A Time profile called her a “whip-smart, button-cute leftie.” It said she radiates an essential decency and suggested that her career rise might signify that “nice is the new nasty.”

Distinguishing herself from others on the left, Maddow has said she’s a “national security liberal” and, in a different interview, that she is not “a partisan.” The New York Times called her a “defense policy wonk”.

Political Views
Maddow has written Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power (2012), about the role of the military in postwar American politics. During the 2008 presidential election, Maddow did not formally support any candidate. Concerning Barack Obama’s candidacy, Maddow said “I have never and still don’t think of myself as an Obama supporter, either professionally or actually.”

In 2010, Republican Senator Scott Brown, speculated that Maddow was going to run against him in the 2012 Senate election. His campaign used this premise for a fundraising email, while Maddow repeatedly stated that Brown’s speculation was false. Brown continued his claims in Boston media, so Maddow ran a full-page advertisement in The Boston Globe confirming that she was not running and separately demanded Brown’s apology. She added that, despite repeated invitations over the months, Brown had refused to appear on her TV program.  Ultimately, it was Elizabeth Warren who ran in 2012, defeating Brown.

In December 2013, The Washington Post announced that Maddow would write a monthly opinion column for the paper, contributing one article per month for a period of six months.

Personal Life
Maddow lives in Manhattan and western Massachusetts with her partner, artist Susan Mikula. They met in 1999 when Maddow was working on her doctoral dissertation. Maddow has dealt with cyclical depression since puberty. In a 2012 interview, she stated, “It doesn’t take away from my joy or my work or my energy, but coping with depression is something that is part of the everyday way that I live and have lived for as long as I can remember.”

Honors and Awards
Emmy Award in the Outstanding News Discussion and Analysis category for “The Rachel Maddow Show” episode “Good Morning Landlocked Central Asia!”
Maddow was named in Out magazine’s “Out 100” list of the “gay men and women who moved culture” in 2008.
Maddow was voted “Lesbian/Bi Woman of the Year (American)” in AfterEllen’s 2008 Visibility Awards.
Maddow won a Gracie Award in 2009, presented by the American Women in Radio and Television.
In 2009, Maddow was nominated for GLAAD’s 20th Annual Media Awards for a segment of her MSNBC show, “Rick Warren, Change To Believe In?”, in the Outstanding TV Journalism Segment category.
On March 28, 2009, Maddow received a Proclamation of Honor from the California State Senate, presented in San Francisco by California State Senator Mark Leno.
In April 2009, she was listed at number four in Out magazine’s Annual Power 50 List.
Maddow placed sixth in the “2009 AfterEllen.com Hot 100” list (May 11, 2009) and third in its “2009 Hot 100: Out Women” version.
Maddow was included on a list of openly gay media professionals in The Advocate’s “Forty under 40” issue of June/July 2009.
In 1994, Maddow was an Honorable Mention in the Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity Prize in Ethics.
In June 2009, Maddow’s MSNBC show was the only cable news show nominated for a Television Critics Association award in the Outstanding Achievement in News and Information category.
In March 2010, Maddow won at the 21st Annual GLAAD Media Awards in the category, Outstanding TV Journalism- Newsmagazine for her segment, “Uganda Be Kidding Me”.
Maddow was the 2010 commencement speaker and was given an honorary Doctor of Laws (LLD) degree at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts in May 2010.
In July 2010, Maddow was presented with a Maggie Award for her ongoing reporting of healthcare reform, the murder of Dr. George Tiller, and the anti-abortion movement.
In August 2010, Maddow won the Walter Cronkite Faith & Freedom Award, which was presented by the Interfaith Alliance.  Past honorees included Larry King, Tom Brokaw, and the late Peter Jennings.
In February 2012, Maddow was presented the John Steinbeck Award by the Martha Heasley Cox Center for Steinbeck Studies at San Jose State University.
Outstanding Host at the 2012 Gracie Allen Awards
In December 2012, the audio book version of Maddow’s Drift was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album
Bibliography
Maddow, Rachel (2012). Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power. Crown. ISBN 978-0-307-46098-1.

rachel m

RACHEL MADDOW YOU ROCK!

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Website http://www.rachelmaddow.com

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