FEMINIST FRIDAY 2018

I have watched with great interest and a very happy heart the young activist from the Marjory Stoneman Douglas School working to make a change in the gun control policies in the United States.  They have been unstinting in their efforts to try to make a change that would guarantee the right to safety at school to every student in our country.  I have always been curious about who the people are that schools are named after.  Imagine how please I was to read about Marjory Stoneman Douglas.  This school is named after a very inspiring activist.  I guess the students come by their activism honestly.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas

Marjory Stoneman Douglas’s 1947 best seller, The Everglades: River of Grass, raised America’s consciousness and transformed the Florida Everglades from an area that was looked upon as a useless swamp – to be drained and developed commercially – to a national park that is seen as a valuable environmental resource to be protected and preserved. After this successful campaign to preserve the Everglades as a national park, Douglas continued her work by founding the Friends of the Everglades, a conservation organization still active today.

Always ahead of her time, Douglas graduated from Wellesley College as an English major in 1912. A few years later, Douglas went to Miami to be a reporter for her father’s newspaper, which later became The Miami Herald. During World War I, she served with the American Red Cross in Europe. After the war, she launched her career as a newspaper editor at her father’s paper. Many of her editorials focused on what she perceived to be Florida’s increasing problem of rapid commercial development. In the 1920s, she left the newspaper to launch a second career as an author. Over the years she published many books and short stories, both fiction and non-fiction – most for adults but several for children – especially focusing on women, the history and life in southern Florida and environmental issues. She also engaged in a number of other campaigns and charity work to improve society: campaigns against slum-lords and for improved housing conditions, for free milk for babies whose parents needed aid, and for the ratification of the Women’s Suffrage Amendment.

Most important, she dedicated her life to preserving and restoring the Everglades. She lived long enough to witness great successes. In 1996, for example, Florida voters passed a constitutional amendment that held polluters primarily responsible for cleaning up the Everglades. And the Florida and federal governments have authorized multimillion-dollar projects to restore and expand the Everglades. In recognition of her tireless and successful struggle, the state of Florida named the headquarters of its Department of Natural Resources after her.

Awarding Mrs. Douglas the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1993, President Clinton recognized her achievements. Upon her death in 1998 at the age of 108, President Clinton said: “Long before there was an Earth Day, Mrs. Douglas was a passionate steward of our nation’s natural resources, and particularly her Florida Everglades.”

MARJORY STONEMAN DOUGLAS YOU ROCK!

 

I invite you to leave a link in the comments section to an article you have posted about an inspiring woman.

The information in this article was obtained from Wikidpedia.

MY WEEKLY THANK YOU NOTE TO THE CREATOR

life is a gift

“I wish it need not have happened in my time,” said Frodo.
“So do I,” said Gandalf, “and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

(Thank you Linda at Teacher Dance for sharing this Tolkien quote.)

I have spent most of this week writing about the madness that happened in Orlando.  I started the week with a feeling of sadness and frustration that these killing keep happening in our country.  When the President drew it to the country’s attention that this was the 15th time in 8 years that he has spoken after this type of killing, I started to feel a sense of anxiety about the world I was leaving to my grandchildren.  Then my blogging community responded with so many heartfelt words that I have ended the week with a renewed sense of belief in the goodness of my fellow travelers on this planet.

love

BUT A LITTLE COMMON SENSE REGARDING GUN CONTROL WOULDN’T HURT.

Wishing you a peace filled week,

bernadette

I am also linking this post to Ruth Ayer’s wonderful web page – Ruth Ayers Writes.  If you get a chance go visit.  You will leave feeling happy.

MY WEEKLY THANK YOU NOTE TO GOD. THANK YOU RUTH AYERS FOR MAKING THIS SPACE AVAILABLE.
MY WEEKLY THANK YOU NOTE TO GOD. THANK YOU RUTH AYERS FOR MAKING THIS SPACE AVAILABLE.

Slice of Life – A Call To Action

Every Tuesday Two Writing Teachers provide an opportunity to share your writing.
Every Tuesday Two Writing Teachers provide an opportunity to share your writing.

 

The madness in our country continues.  The hate and ugliness continues to damage the beauty and hope of our wonderful democracy.

As individuals we can make sure that our little children are brought up and taught to love and respect others and as adults we should be railing against this violence by adding our voices to those who want better gun control.

southpacific

You’ve got to be taught
To hate and fear,
You’ve got to be taught
From year to year,
It’s got to be drummed
In your dear little ear
You’ve got to be carefully taught.

You’ve got to be taught to be afraid
Of people whose eyes are oddly made,
And people whose skin is a diff’rent shade,
You’ve got to be carefully taught.

You’ve got to be taught before it’s too late,
Before you are six or seven or eight,
To hate all the people your relatives hate,
You’ve got to be carefully taught!

Songwriters
Rogers and Hammerstein

The following in a snippet from Women’s Voices For Change, womensvoicesforchange.org. Take a moment to go there and read this call to action.

Monday, June 13, 2016
Dr. Pat: 14 Mass Shootings and Counting
June 13, 2016 by Patricia Yarberry Allen, M.D.
“Women can force the people we elect to represent us in Congress to hear that we have had enough. Women can insist that our representatives enact legislation that will make the sale of these guns illegal. Women have a voice because we vote and we need to send a message to Washington that we have had too many mass killings in this country because someone could buy an assault rifle.”

Patricia Yarberry-Allen, MD is a gynecologist, director of the New York Menopause Center, a Clinical Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Weill Cornell Medical College, and an Assistant Attending Obstetrician and Gynecologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital . She is a board certified fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Yarberry- Allen is also a member of the Faculty Advisory Board and the Women’s Health Director of The Weill Cornell Community Clinic (WCCC). Dr. Allen was the recipient of the 2014 American Medical Women’s Association Presidential Award.
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