FEMINIST FRIDAY 2018

LITTLE GIRLS WITH DREAMS BECOME WOMEN WITH VISION.

One of the blogs I follow is the Youth Services Association.  Whenever I start to feel down about the state of the planet and our fellow citizens, I hop over to this site and I am uplifted by the zeal of the children for creating a bright future for us all.  I thought I might share one of the stories with you.  Enjoy.

Everyday Young Hero: Arushi Madan

Global Goal 13: Climate Action – Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impact

Known as the “Green Machine,” due to her great passion for the environment, Arushi Madan (17, Sharjah, UAE) takes every opportunity to spread awareness about the need to protect the environment and reduce waste. She is addressing the issue of climate change by spreading environmental awareness through environmental protection. The campaigns and workshops she runs educate and encourage community members to take action. Believing in actions more than words, Arushi works at the grassroots level to set an example for others to follow. She is on a mission to inspire and empower more eco-warriors to lead a green future.

Arushi aims to promote environmental values by setting positive examples. She has set up an effective waste segregation system in her building that sorts and recycles about one ton of paper every month. Each ton of recycled paper saves 17 trees and 4000 KW of energy. By recycling about one ton of paper monthly since June 2014, Arushi has saved about 782 trees and about 184,000 KW of energy. This has contributed to the reduction of the carbon footprint, but most importantly it is educating the residents of her community on the simple actions they can take to improve the environment. Her goal is to set up the waste segregation systems in at least 10 more buildings in her community. She aims to divert maximum waste from landfill by changing people’s attitude towards environment and showing them how they can make a difference everyday.

Arushi has diligently influenced many in her community about environmental protection through her campaigns, workshops, and self-initiated projects. She visits schools to spread awareness and interact with kids using environmental videos, games, quizzes, and “Green Talk” sessions. She teaches students about the benefits of organic farming and organizes educational trips for youth to sustainable buildings and other “green” UAE sites. She campaigns at food courts, malls, cafeterias and she gives motivational presentations to educate women, laborers, and children. Arushi has put together several successful environmental campaigns. “Save Paper, Save Trees, Save Planet” motivated about 70 people to recycle one ton of paper while learning tips that help reduce their carbon footprint, as well as save trees and energy. Through her “Earth Hour” campaign in India, students learned the true meaning of Earth hour and got energy saving tips such as, candle-lit dinners, LED lamps, and unplugging idle appliances. She involved hundreds a campaign called “A Dose of Help” that collected more than 1000 unused medications that were donated to the Emirates Red Crescent, in order to help patients in need. She mobilizes and engages youth and adults in tree planting and community clean-up campaigns. Her projects have drastically reduced waste going to landfills, energy consumption, and inspired youth to take lead when promoting sustainability.

Arushi’s efforts to minimize waste in her own building have not only inspired the residents around her to take part in the movement, it has inspired community members to implement waste segregation systems in their own buildings. With the sponsorship and help of environmental agencies and corporations she has mobilized youth to work towards environmental protection. Through leading newspapers and magazines, she shares her concerns about the environment and offers sustainable tips.  Her efforts are appreciated by local government and municipalities who have honored her on World Environment Day. Arushi is truly a role model for those who follow her practices and most importantly the youth she inspires in her community everyday.

ARUSHI MADAN YOU ROCK!

If you have a story about an inspirational woman, teen, child, please share a link to your post in the comments section.

The information in this post came from an article written by YSA Partnerships Intern, Haley Panek.

 

FEMINIST FRIDAY – SYLVIA EARLE

Today I would like to introduce you to National Geographic Society Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Sylvia A. Earle, called “Her Deepness” by the New Yorker and the New York Times, “Living Legend” by the Library of Congress, and first “Hero for the Planet” by Time magazine.

What follows is a biography prepared by the Academy of Achievement in Washington, D.C.

Sylvia Earle was born in Gibbstown, New Jersey. Her parents raised her on a small farm near Camden. From the time she was very small, Sylvia loved exploring the woods near her home. She was fascinated by the creatures and plants that lived in the wild. Neither of her parents had a college education, but they too loved nature, and they taught young Sylvia to respect wild creatures and not to be afraid of the unknown. Those who have followed her adult career may wonder if she is afraid of anything.

When Sylvia was 13, the family moved to Clearwater, Florida, on the Gulf of Mexico. Soon, Sylvia was learning all she could about the wildlife of the Gulf and its coast. Her parents could not afford to send her to college themselves, but she was an exceptional student and won scholarships to the Florida State. Throughout her school years, she supported herself by working in college laboratories.
Here, she first learned scuba diving, determined to use this new technology to study marine life at first hand. Fascinated by all aspects of the ocean and marine life, Sylvia decided to specialize in botany. Understanding the vegetation, she believes, is the first step to understanding any ecosystem.
After earning her Master’s at Duke University, Sylvia Earle took time off to marry and start a family but remained active in marine exploration. In 1964, when her children were only two and four, she left home for six weeks to join a National Science Foundation expedition in the Indian Ocean. Throughout the mid-1960s, she struggled to balance the demands of her family with scientific expeditions that took her all over the world.
In 1966 Sylvia Earle received her Ph.D. from Duke. Her dissertation “Phaeophyta of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico” created a sensation in the oceanographic community. Never before had a marine scientist made such a long and detailed first-hand study of aquatic plant life. Since then she has made a lifelong project of cataloguing every species of plant that can be found in the Gulf of Mexico.

Dr. Earle’s burgeoning career took her first to Harvard, as a research fellow, then to the resident directorship of the Cape Haze Marine Laboratory, in Florida. In 1968, Dr. Earle traveled to a hundred feet below the waters of the Bahamas in the submersible Deep Diver. She was four months pregnant at the time.
In 1969 she applied to participate in the Tektite project. This venture, sponsored jointly by the U.S. Navy, the Department of the Interior and NASA allowed teams of scientist to live for weeks at a time in an enclosed habitat on the ocean floor fifty feet below the surface, off the Virgin Islands. By this time, Sylvia had spent more than a thousand research hours underwater, more than any other scientists who applied to the program, but, as she says, “the people in charge just couldn’t cope with the idea of men and women living together underwater.”
The result was Tektite II, Mission 6, an all-female research expedition led by Dr. Earle herself. In 1970, Sylvia Earle and four other women dove 50 feet below the surface to the small structure they would call home for the next two weeks.
The publicity surrounding this adventure made Sylvia Earle a recognizable face beyond the scientific community. To their surprise, the scientists found they had become celebrities and were given a ticker-tape parade and a White House reception. After that Sylvia Earle was increasingly in demand as public speaker, and she became an outspoken advocate of undersea research. At the same time, she began to write for National Geographic and to produce books and films. Besides trying to arouse greater public interest in the sea, she hoped to raise public awareness of the damage being done to our aquasphere by pollution and environmental degradation.

In the 1970s, scientific missions took Sylvia Earle to the Galapagos, to the water off Panama, to China and the Bahamas and, again, to the Indian Ocean. During this period she began a productive collaboration with undersea photographer Al Giddings. Together, they investigated the battleship graveyard in the Caroline Islands of the South Pacific.
In 1977 they made their first voyage following the great sperm whales. In a series of expeditions they followed the whales from Hawaii to New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, Bermuda and Alaska. Their journeys were recorded in the documentary film Gentle Giants of the Pacific (1980).
In 1979, Sylvia Earle walked untethered on the sea floor at a lower depth than any living human being before or since. In the so-called Jim suit, a pressurized one-atmosphere garment, she was carried by a submersible down to the depth of 1,250 feet below the ocean’s surface off of the island of Oahu. At the bottom, she detached from the vessel and explored the depths for two and a half hours with only a communication line connecting her to the submersible, and nothing at all connecting her to the world above. She described this adventure in her 1980 book: Exploring the Deep Frontier.

In the 1980s, along with engineer Graham Hawkes, she started the companies Deep Ocean Engineering and Deep Ocean Technologies. These ventures design and build undersea vehicles like Deep Rover and Deep Flight which are making it possible for scientists to maneuver at depths that defied all previously existing technology. In the middle of this life of adventure, Sylvia Earle has been married and raised three children, some of whom have worked side by side with her at Deep Ocean Engineering.
In the early 1990s, Dr. Earle took a leave of absence from her companies to serve as Chief Scientist of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. There, among other duties, Sylvia Earle was responsible for monitoring the health of the nation’s waters. In this capacity she also reported on the environmental damage wrought by Iraq’s burning of the Kuwaiti oil fields.
Today, Dr. Earle is Explorer in Residence at the National Geographic Society. More recently, she led the Google Ocean Advisory Council, a team of 30 marine scientists providing content and scientific oversight for the “Ocean in Google Earth.” To date, she has led over 70 expeditions, logging more than 6500 hours underwater. Among the more than 100 national and international honors she has received is the 2009 TED Prize for her proposal to establish a global network of marine protected areas. She calls these marine preserves “hope spots… to save and restore… the blue heart of the planet.”

©1996 – 2016 American Academy of Achievement. All Rights Reserved

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SYLVIA EARLE YOU ROCK!

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