SENIOR SALON 2017

 

creaturity3

We have walked our paths a long time and have a lot to offer. Come and reveal your artistic vision.

The SENIOR SALON is dedicated to showcasing the talents of the post 9 to 5 generation. The generation who finally has time to get in touch with the right side of their brain.  The SENIOR SALON features art, music, writing, poetry, photography, creative cooking, creative fashion, and anything else that you can dream up.   Allow YOUR muse to guide you into a new creative endeavor or enhance an existing creative endeavor.

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My Other Passion…

A very interesting thought provoking video. Perhaps a way we could all help end hunger?

New York North Fine Art

Hi Everyone,

I am taking a little detour from the normal course of showing my paintings here today. This is something I am also passionate about and am hoping that you will share this on your blogs, facebook, twitter, and by any other means you can!!! Thanks so much for watching… it is short by the way, less than two minutes.  ~Rita 🙂

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Grandma’s Legacy: A Poem by Bette A. Stevens

Bette gives us a lovely poem about her inspirational grandmother.

Bette A. Stevens, Maine Author

grandmas-legacy-basGrandma’s Legacy is a poem that I wrote several years ago in honor of a truly great woman—Elizabeth A. Babcock, born January 1, 1898, died January 1, 1975. Grandma lives on in the hearts and memories of all whose lives she touched. The photo ( circa 1952) of me and Grandma was taken by my dear father, one of Grandma’s eight children.  ~ Bette A. Stevens

“A writer inspired by nature and human nature”

“Look    Inside” Bette’s books at http://viewauthor.at/BetteAStevens

[Explore Bette’s Blog]

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FEMINIST FRIDAY

 

In the 1970’s the feminist movement brought recognition to domestic arts and textiles.  This led to the rediscovery of Harriet Powers, whose two surviving quilts currently hang in the Smithsonian and in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

Harriet Powers, folk artist and quilt maker, was born into slavery outside Athens, Georgia (1837). She was married at 18 and gave birth to nine children. She lived most of her life in Clarke County, where in 1897, she began exhibiting her quilts at local cotton fairs. She was believed to have been a house slave and first learned to read with the help of the white children she cared for.

Powers quilts used a combination of hand and machine stitching along with appliqué to form small detailed panels. She then organized these squares to unfold a larger story, much like a modern graphic novel. This teaching style of quilting has its roots in West African coastal communities, and her uneven edging of panels mirrored the complex rhythms of African-American folk music. Through her quilts, she recorded legends and biblical tales of patience and divine justice. Only two pieces of her work have survived: Her Bible quilt of 1886, which she sold for $5 in the aftermath of the war, now hangs in the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. Her Pictorial quilt of 1888 is displayed in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Powers’ work is now considered among the finest examples of Southern quilting from the 19th century.

Harriet Powers. Pictorial quilt. 1895-98. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Harriet Powers. Pictorial quilt. 1895-98. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

 

 

 

 

 

Harriet Powers Bible Quilt, Smithsonian

HARRIET POWERS YOU ROCK!

The information in this post first appeared in the The Writer’s Almanac.

I invite you to share a link to your story of an inspiring woman.

SENIOR SALON 2017

creaturity3

We have walked our paths a long time and have a lot to offer. Come and reveal your artistic vision.

The SENIOR SALON is dedicated to showcasing the talents of the post 9 to 5 generation. The generation who finally has time to get in touch with the right side of their brain.  The SENIOR SALON features art, music, writing, poetry, photography, creative cooking, creative fashion, and anything else that you can dream up.   Allow YOUR muse to guide you into a new creative endeavor or enhance an existing creative endeavor.

Continue reading

GRATITUDE WEEK 2017- SATURDAY

 

I am participating in Gratitude Week 2017 which is hosted by the very lovely Michelle at Michellegd.com.  It is for one week and open to anyone.

Today and I am grateful to have the opportunity to practice gratitude and become more mindful thanks to the very special prompts provided by Michelle.  So what follows is today’s prompt from Michelle.  I am sharing it with you because I believe in the concept of paying it forward.

6saturday

One generation plants the trees; another gets the shade.
~Chinese Proverb~

I believe in collective effort; I believe in community. I believe that our gathering together for this special Gratitude Week carries a certain weight in the world. Most people on the face of this earth, let alone our immediate communities, will not know that we’ve been paying special attention to gratitude this week. But we know it. And, as we practice it, it will ripple into the world.

Gratitude has a way of softening the edges. It doesn’t take away the stressful commute or the chronic pain, but it opens our eyes wide to the fullness of the life we live. And when we, as individuals, begin to see this and know this and embrace this, it colors the way we move in the world. We will still stumble and make mistakes, but we will dust ourselves off and carry on with our work. The work of the office, the work of the house, the work of the heart. We will be the best people that we can be. And we will touch the lives of others.

We will be the ones remembering to say please and thank you. We will be the ones bringing in the mail for the elderly neighbor. We will be the ones holding the door. We will be the ones picking up trash at the park. We will be the ones donating time, money, skill. We will be the ones making home.

We will be the ones noticing the light falling across the floor. We will be the ones making someone smile. We will be the ones admiring the flowers. We will be the ones giving one more hug.

Those around us will see our practice. Some of them will follow suit. Others might not be quite ready, and that’s okay. But, in being our best (and most grateful) selves, we invite others to do the same. We needn’t say a word; we simply lead by example.

Children will see. Spouses will see. Aging parents and neighbors and co-workers and store clerks will see. We begin a practice of gratitude for ourselves, as a way to stay grounded and thankful. But, like the ripples of water that spread from the toss of a pebble, our gratitude also spreads. Our personal gratitudes rest in our hearts (remember Thursday’s reflection?), but they have a way of moving beyond ourselves.

Gratitude is never stagnant. It grows, it blooms. It gives shade to those who need it. It lies within, but it flourishes without. Plant your seeds of gratitude. A little here, a little there. Watch the shade spread; watch the rippled rings expand. First, begin where you are.

always the love, m

GWquote6

Here’s how you can play along in community:

1. Share your gratitudes with #GratitudeWeek2017 on Instagram.
2. Leave a comment on my Gratitude Week blog post and/or link to your own blog post. You can share in my post any or all days.
3. Send me an email…I love them, I read them, I respond to them.
4. Reflect privately at home.

As is true for so much of the work I do, there are no rules. Move through this week in the way that feels best for you. There are no expectations; there is just you and me and we. Here we are together for seven days.

***

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GRATITUDE WEEK 2017- FRIDAY

 

I am participating in Gratitude Week 2017 which is hosted by the very lovely Michelle at Michellegd.com.  It is for one week and open to anyone.

Next Goldilocks went upstairs, where she found three beds. There was a great big bed, a middle-sized bed and a tiny little bed. By now she was feeling rather tired. so she climbed into the big bed and lay down. The big bed was very hard and far too big. Then she tried the middle-sized bed, but that was far too soft. so she climbed into the tiny little bed. It was neither too hard nor too soft. In fact, it felt just right, all cosy and warm. and in no tine at all Goldilocks fell fast asleep.

Today’s gratitude post may seem a little silly.  But when I woke up this first very cold day of the season, I couldn’t help but feel grateful for the luxury of my bed.  I had a few moments of wonderful meditation as I noted the comfy down pillow covered in whisper soft fabric that cooled my cheek, the cuddly quilt that was keeping my body toasty warm as I listened to the cold wind whip around outside, and the splendor of having a mattress that is “just right”.

FEMINIST FRIDAY

Saturday, November 11 is a day set aside to honor our country’s Veterans of War.  Today I am using this space to honor American Women Veterans.

World War I

(1917-1918)

More than 35,000 American women served in the military during World War I.

Their service helped propel the passage of the 19th Amendment

Upwards of 25,000 American women between the ages of 21 and 69 served overseas during World War I. They began going in August of 1914—at first singly or with a few companions, later with service organizations, and lastly at the request of the U.S. government. Although the largest number were nurses, women served in numerous other capacities – from administrators and secretaries to telephone operators and architects. Many women continued to serve long after Armistice Day, some returning home as late as 1923. Their efforts and contributions in the Great War left a lasting legacy that inspired change across the nation. The service of these women helped propel the passage of the 19th Amendment, June 4, 1919, guaranteeing women the right to vote.

Army nurses were sent to Europe to support the American Expeditionary Forces. Training with gas masks was mandatory for all women serving in France in WWI. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Army Women's Museum)

Army Nurse Corps

Army Nurse Corps

More than half of the women who served in the U.S. armed forces in World War I – roughly 21,000 – belonged to the Army Nurse Corps.

U.S. Army Signal Corps

U.S. Army Signal Corps

The U.S. Army Signal Corps recruited and trained more than 220 women – best known as the “Hello Girls” – to serve overseas as bilingual telephone operators.

Civilian Welfare Organizations

Civilian Welfare Organization

Women served in large numbers in civilian welfare organizations both at home and abroad, including the American Red Cross, YMCA, and Salvation Army.

Historical Highlights

World War II

(1939-1945)

‘To free a man to fight’

Although the idea of women in the Army other than the Army Nurse Corps was not completely abandoned following World War I, it was not until the threat of world war loomed again that renewed interest was given to this issue. With the rumblings of World War II on the horizon, Congresswoman Edith Nourse Rogers of Massachusetts states, “I was resolved that our women would not again serve with the Army without the same protection the men got.” Consequently, the creation of the Women’s Army Corps is one of the most dramatic gender-changing events in American history.

Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs) were the first brave women to fly American military aircraft. They forever changed the role of women in aviation.

Women step up to perform an array of critical Army jobs, “to free a man to fight.” They work in hundreds of fields such as military intelligence, cryptography, parachute rigging, maintenance and supply, to name a few. Additionally, more than 60,000 Army Nurses serve around the world and over 1,000 women flew aircraft for the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots. Through the course of the war, 140,000 women served in the U.S. Army and the Women’s Army Corps proved itself vital to the effort. The selfless sacrifice of these brave women usher in new economic and social changes that will forever alter the role of women in American society.

A Permanent Presence

(1945-1954)

Gender and racial integration

The period immediately following World War II was one of uncertainty and constant change for the Women’s Army Corps personnel. The original intent of the WAC was to last for the duration of the war plus 6-months. However, this post-war period also marked great strides for integrating both the WAC and the Army Nurse Corps into the Regular Army.

Historical Highlights

Professional and Poised

(1955-1970)

The Women’s Army marches on

After the Korean War, and with the move of the WAC Training Center and School to Fort McClellan, Ala., the focus of the Corps shifted to the examination of management practices and the image of the WAC. The WAC directors in the 1950s and 1960s sought to expand WAC by increasing the types of jobs available in the Army, and by promoting the Corps to not only possible recruits, but also to their family members. The leadership worked hard to act as role models and to instruct the women to respect the Corps, take pride in their work, and ensure that their personal behavior and appearance was always above reproach. Their success was marked by a request from the Army chief of staff to lift the recruitment ceiling on the number of women. It was also during this era we see the removal of restrictions on promotions, assignments and utilization.

A Time of Change

(1970-1978)

Moving toward equality and the disestablishment of the WAC

The Vietnam War, the elimination of the draft, and the rise of the feminist movement had a major impact on both the Women’s Army Corps and Army Nurse Corps. There was a renewed emphasis on parity and increased opportunity for women in uniform.

A New Era

(1980s-1990s)

Providing greater opportunities for women

The disestablishment of the WAC and the integration of women into the Regular Army paved the way for women to continue breaking down gender barriers. In the ensuing years, the Army was called upon to respond to regional conflicts, natural disasters and humanitarian crises around the globe. The roles of Army Women are tested and re-defined during these contingency operations.

Post 9/11

(2001-Present)

Looking to the future

The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 mark a pivotal changing point for Army women. As the Army’s mission changed on the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan, so did the roles of women in its ranks. With the Global War on Terror campaign, there was a rapid expansion of jobs and change in roles for Army women. Beginning In 2016, women have the equal right to choose any military occupational specialty including ground combat units that were previously unauthorized.

 Please feel free to add a link to your post about a special Veteran in your life in the comments section.

GRATITUDE WEEK 2017 – THURSDAY

I am participating in Gratitude Week 2017 which is hosted by the very lovely Michelle at Michellegd.com.  It is for one week and open to anyone.

One of the things in my life I am so consistently grateful for is bearing witness to the change in seasons.  I have been graced to live in Haddonfield for 39 years and there has been no finer place on the planet to watch this beauty unfold.

I took this picture last week.  I was struck by the contrast of the unseasonal warm weather and the stark November landscape. If the weatherman is right about this week, you better go looking for that sweater.

And I stumbled upon this poem awhile ago and I think it is perfect for this month.

The Birds

BY LINDA PASTAN

are heading south, pulled
by a compass in the genes.
They are not fooled
by this odd November summer,
though we stand in our doorways
wearing cotton dresses.
We are watching them
as they swoop and gather—
the shadow of wings
falls over the heart.
When they rustle among
the empty branches, the trees
must think their lost leaves
have come back.
The birds are heading south,
instinct is the oldest story.
They fly over their doubles,
the mute weathervanes,
teaching all of us
with their tailfeathers
the true north.

GRATITUDE WEEK 2017- WEDNESDAY

 

I am participating in Gratitude Week 2017 which is hosted by the very lovely Michelle at Michellegd.com.  It is for one week and open to anyone.

This was Michelle’s prompt this morning:

When I count my blessings, I count you twice.
~Irish Traditional Proverb~

I think every grandmother counts her grandchildren as a very rare and special blessing in her life.  Grandchildren are the jewels in the crown of  a loving family.

But, I am especially grateful today for my grandson, Lucas.  Yesterday afternoon found me welcoming sadness back into my life.  I had received news about the health of a very loved friend and that news left me emotionally devastated.

But a little bit later, the phone rang and it was Lucas.  I had sent Lucas the latest installment of the Wimpy Kid series and he was over the moon excited to receive it.  He couldn’t wait to dive into it and start reading. He laughed his magical laugh and described in detail how funny the illustration was on the back cover.   I couldn’t help but smile and get caught up his enthusiasm and to be so very grateful to share a love of reading with my grandchild.