FEMINIST FRIDAY – MY FRIEND MAGGI

May is National Brain Tumor Awareness Month.  This is something I was never aware of or ever thought about until this month.  My dear friend Maggi is in the hospital fighting for her life against a malignant brain tumor.

I have been blest to call Maggi my friend since I was 20 years old.  She was the first friend I made from our Medical School crowd.  She was an instant friend.  She was smart and kind.  She loved to read all kind of books, she was a woman’s libber, she believed in Martin Luther King’s cause and she was kind to everyone.  She loved to dance and listened to all kinds of music and was always up for an adventure or a road trip.

As Maggi got older she didn’t change.  Her kindness to others only increased.  She has legions of loyal friends because of this wonderful quality.  She has two beautiful children who would tell you that she raised them to be independent and thoughtful people, and they are.

Maggi is married to Joe who is a pediatric doctor.  This isn’t an easy life for a wife.  Your husband is gone a lot of the time and when he is home can be bone tired and preoccupied with worry about a patient.  Honestly, though, I never heard Maggi complain about this part of her life.  Come to think of it, I don’t think I ever heard her complain about any part of her life.  She always had a philosophical outlook and was filled with gratitude.

Maggi is a good example of how to live life well.  Here is a picture of Maggi and me.  I am 22 and on the left and Maggi is 25 and on the right.

mag2

MAGGI YOU ROCK!

Now, what follows is some information about the early symptoms of Brain Tumor.  I know that Maggi would want everyone to have this information.  It comes from the Mayo Clinic website which contain even more detailed information than what follows.

Symptoms

The signs and symptoms of a brain tumor vary greatly and depend on the brain tumor’s size, location and rate of growth.

General signs and symptoms caused by brain tumors may include:

New onset or change in pattern of headaches
Headaches that gradually become more frequent and more severe
Unexplained nausea or vomiting
Vision problems, such as blurred vision, double vision or loss of peripheral vision
Gradual loss of sensation or movement in an arm or a leg
Difficulty with balance
Speech difficulties
Confusion in everyday matters
Personality or behavior changes
Seizures, especially in someone who doesn’t have a history of seizures
Hearing problems
When to see a doctor

Make an appointment with your doctor if you have persistent signs and symptoms that concern you.

 

I INVITE YOU TO SHARE A POST ABOUT A WOMAN WHO INSPIRES YOU. JUST TAP ON THE LINKZ FROG TO POST. WE CAN NEVER SHARE TOO MANY STORIES ABOUT INSPIRING WOMEN.

THIS POST WILL STAY OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT TUESDAY NIGHT.

 

About Bernadette

I live in the small town of Haddonfield, NJ. I am at an age in my life when I seem to spend time thinking and musing about life. These musings are usually stimulated by my walks through Haddonfield, my reading of books and fellow bloggers, and my interaction with my group of fabulous family and friends.

19 Responses

  1. Well it was really hard to “like” this post, but it was to just acknowledge it. Again, I am so sorry for your wonderful friend and her fight with this terrible disease. So much is unknown about this. I am sure she is fighting the fight as best she can, as she looks like a great fighter! God bless your friend Maggi and her family and friends. xo

    Liked by 2 people

  2. This is such a moving post and I feel the joy and zest for life that Maggi and you enjoyed. This is a terrible diagnosis and I am so sorry for your friend. Two children at my son’s school had brain tumours – one was a close friend and he was diagnosed on the Monday and passed away that Friday. Horrendous and I’m in tears just writing about it. For months the boy had complained about headaches, been off PE lessons for the same amount of time. In the end the optician saw the problem and had him sent to hospital. Too late. The same optician saw another older girl and this time, thankfully she could be treated and is now in remission. I pray all goes well for your friend. Loving family and friends around you is so important in these terrible times.

    Like

  3. I wish your dear friend Maggie the best and highest outcome during this extreme health challenge. It is always so difficult when someone we love receives such a diagnosis.

    This post really resonated with me for two reasons. One, a friend (in NJ actually) received a similar diagnosis some time ago. Second, this post was such an excellent balance of personal story with factual and accurate information on the symptoms. Thank you. 📮

    Liked by 1 person

THANK YOU FOR READING. I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s